dcsimg

Our Brand

Our Heritage


1943-1960

Telotype

Telotype
This product was developed in 1943. Records indicate that it received and printed air defense codes on paper tape, including the direction, time, model, number and routes of incoming aircraft, and controlled electrical contacts to light up points on a map.

Page Telotype for Japanese and European Scripts (Teletypewriter)

Page Telotype for Japanese and European Scripts
This is OKI’s first page telotype for Japanese and European scripts from 1953, the start of our printer history. It had functions such as typing perforator reception and unattended operation, and printed at a rate of 50 bps, approximately 375 characters a minute at six units per character (approx. 6 characters/second).

Kanji Teletypewriter

Kanji Teletypewriter
This teletypewriter from 1955 featured the ability to clearly print approximately 2,500 characters (using a still-print method that printed with the platen and print type stopped). The print unit had 26 4-by-25-character type pallet arranged in a cylindrical shape and would print by raising a plate and hammering on the print type that was needed. The mechanism used for selecting the type was a differential gear sequence. This teletypewriter could print at a rate of 120 characters per minute (2 per second) and could rightfully be called the immediate predecessor of today’s kanji printers. It was used in actual work settings until 1992.

Page Telotype for Japanese and European Scripts (Teletypewriter)

OKITYPER-2000
This table-top, multifunction electric typewriter from 1960 was developed out of the need for a product that was more compact and more functional than conventional perforating typewriters. Printing was performed with the type-bar method and involved a strong impact, so it could copy around 10 sheets and the print speed was 500 characters per minute for alphanumeric and kana characters. Despite being a compact tabletop model, it had print, read and perforation functions, matching the needs of customers at the time and contributing to office automation. This typewriter has been officially recognized as information processing technology heritage by the Information Processing Society of Japan.

1961-1970

OKI’s First Wire Dot Printer (SIDM)

OKI’s First Wire Dot Printer
In 1964 multiple printing methods were considered and the revolutionary, entirely unprecedented dot print method was developed at a time when only type-based printing was available. At that time there were no means of electronically storing print patterns as there are today, and the character generator (CG) formed characters in 5x7 dots by making small holes in an 80x50 mm steel sheet. (The CG had through-holes opposite of the character pattern, and 35 wires were pushed through the CG plate through guide pipes, so in the print unit, printing would take place with the ends of the wires protruding out in areas without holes in the CG. Characters were selected by mechanically moving the CG).

OKITYPER Page Telotype (ET-4500)

OKITYPER Page Telotype (ET-4500)
This teletypewriter was developed in 1965 to meet demand for a higher speed 5-unit telegraph terminal that used international telegraph codes. The print unit used a moving type-box print method with wires, and the type select mechanism used a unique two differential lever addition method. The send/receive signal distribution (5L-2L, 2L-5L) mechanism used electronic circuits for the first time and achieved high-speed operation to secure a receiving margin. It was a groundbreaking device that was also easy to maintain. It supported transmission speeds of 50, 75 and 100 bps.

2400bps Line Pritner

2400bps Line Pritner
In 1966, this printer was developed as a terminal to handle a 1,200-2,400 bps data transmission service that had been launched at the time. The print method was the type-belt method, which had long had a track record in computer output devices, but the mechanism was made as compact as possible and the controller used delay line memory instead of expensive core memory, so the price could be reduced to a revolutionary degree for a line printer.

1971-1980

OKI’s First Wire Dot Printer (SIDM)

OKI’s First Wire Dot Printer
1972 saw the debut of an ultra-high-speed line printer based on an entirely new non-impact principle. This printer’s principle was the method of printing on recording paper by attaching a magnetically controlled ion stream to the ink mist. The print speed was 8,000 lines per minute in ANK mod and 4,000 per minute in kanji mode. It printed at near blinding speed.

OKITYPER‐8000

OKITYPER‐8000

OKITYPER‐8000

This electronic impact dot matrix printer was developed in 1973, and its technology would form the foundation for our present-day SIDM MICROLINE Series. Characters were created with 5x7 dots, and the print head (differing from today’s spring-charge format) printed through the absorption action of seven plungers. Spacing, line feed and other mechanisms were expedited with use of servo motors. The print speed was 80 characters per second. It was the fastest impact dot printer in the world at the time.

DP‐100 Dot Line Printer

DP‐100 Dot Line Printer
In 1975, line printers at the time commonly used concurrent printing with matrix type, and this product was revolutionary for its expanded-width/height characters, image mode and other functions. The mechanism featured 22 1-pin print heads in a row on a shuttle bar that moved back-and-forth at a fixed speed. Each head could print six characters and so the printer would print 22 times that, or 132 characters. After printing a single dot line, the sheet would be moved one dot’s worth and seven dots’ worth would be repeatedly printed in the same way to complete one line of printing.

MICROLINE 80 Series

MICROLINE 80 Series
This tabletop serial impact dot printer was developed in 1979 to meet demand for low cost, compact, lightweight and high reliability products, demand that had increased with the spread of personal computers. U.S. sales of models originally developed for Japan took off, leading to further development under a newly acquired trademark, MICROLINE. The printer adopted the compact head with the spring-charge method using a permanent magnet, simplified mechanisms and electronics technologies together to achieve high-speed printing of 80 characters per second for alphanumeric and kana characters as well as low power consumption.

1981-1990

DP-1000

DP-1000
This printer was developed in 1981 as an output device for electronic computers, a data transmission terminal and an output printer for office computers. It was a dot line printer using the highly versatile multi-head method that printed while moving four heads mounted at equal intervals back and forth. It could print kanji characters at the high rate of 125 lines per minute.

ML100 Series

ML100 Series

ML100 Series

This printer from 1984 offered compactness, a light weight, high performance, high quality, and low cost and was capable of being mass produced. It was developed combining many of the design and manufacturing technologies of the time that included the development of the world’s first compact re-inking ribbon and development and adoption of an unprecedented self-propelled carriage-mounted motor, as well as custom LSI, digital servo technology, use of surface mount boards and assembly by automated robot lines (this has since been switched to a different method). The series continues to be developed and sold, and cumulative sales have topped 4.0 million units.

OPP6220

OPP6220
This printer, announced in 1985, was our second-generation LED printer, following the first-generation photo printer (world’s first LED printer from 1981). At the time, it was compact and low price, and was developed as an output terminal for Japanese text processing systems (240 dpi, A4, 16 ppm).

ET-5320S

ET-5320S
This compact flatbed printer from 1986 was the first to be developed for the low-to-medium speed, low-price market. It used a horizontal paper feed mechanism to make it easier to handle a wide variety of media, including the copy paper commonly used for receipts at Japan’s department stores, and to increase stability when in use, and it was adopted for a range of applications. It could print 106 characters per line, a width adopted with an awareness of the receipts and that would become the standard for compact flatbed printers. It was a pioneering product in that it was developed to provide solutions from a hardware perspective, an approach taken for granted today. The printer was developed primarily for the Japanese and Chinese markets.

OL400 / OPP6008

OL400 / OPP6008
In 1989 the need arose for a high print quality, low price printer for Japan and overseas markets, and this printer was developed to be free of screws and wiring and was based on an integrated molded chassis. It incorporated cutting-edge technologies for toner recycling, ozone-free charging and eliminating maintenance by using consumables instead of limited life components. The proprietary LED print head was also made more compact, and the printer itself was smaller and lighter in weight, so the OL400 was developed for overseas markets as a low-priced (it was the first of its kind under 1,000 dollars), non-impact printer (NIP) with A4 paper compatibility, and for Japan, as a compact, wide-width NIP with B4 paper compatibility. It featured high image quality thanks to mono-component toner and contact development.

MICROLINE 801PS

MICROLINE 801PS
With the desktop publishing market growing at a rapid pace, this printer developed in 1990 was capable of handling outline fonts. PostScript developed by Adobe Systems was the de facto global standard for outline fonts. The MICROLINE 801PS supported B4-size paper, larger than A4, so that trim marks could be added to A4-size layout paper, and also offered high 400 dpi resolution and two paper trays. The printer was timed well to market needs and became the standard printer for desktop publishing.

1991-1998

OL400e / MICROLINE 400

OL400e / MICROLINE 400
In 1993 this printer was developed as the successor to the OL400 to meet further demand for compactness, low price, and high print quality. Leveraging the LED print head’s characteristic compactness, it had the world’s smallest outer dimensions for a page printer and a simple structure with substantially fewer parts. Use of polymerized toner made both high print quality and toner recycling possible. The controller was made more compact and an RISC CPU was adopted to achieve two to eight times higher performance than a conventional CISC CPU.

ET‐8570 (Commemorating 10 Million Units)

ET‐8570 (Commemorating 10 Million Units)
The ET-8500 printer in the photo had the commemorative serial number 10,000,000 to mark achievement of 10.0 million MICROLINE Series printers shipped since the series was launched in 1994. (The printer itself had a print speed of 160 characters/second in 24x24 kanji mode, which was around 80 times faster than the first kanji teletypewriters that had debuted a little over thirty years prior.)

MICROLINE 803PSII

MICROLINE 803PSII
In 1994, the Japanese market had long wanted a PostScript printer compatible with A3-size paper. The MICROLINE 803PSII could print A3 extended-size sheets (approx. 30 mm larger horizontally and vertically than A3) as well as enlarge the print range to also print A3 with trim marks. Using polymerized toner with uniformly sized particles, it could print at the high-speed rate of 12 sheets per minute in A4 landscape mode. It featured a Type-1 accelerator board for high-speed processing of Type-1 fonts, an EtherTalk board and other options so that printer systems could be constructed by the user in line with their objectives in terms of print processing speed, network compatibility and the like.

OKIPAGE 4w / MICROLINE 4w

OKIPAGE 4w / MICROLINE 4w
This compact printer from 1996 printed four sheets a minute and was compatible with Windows 95. Inheriting a proprietary print process that used a small-diameter image drum and recyclable toner, it eliminated the cassette to achieve a compact footprint (310 mm width x 191 mm depth) smaller than A4 paper and was designed for ease of use sitting on a desk. For the controller, a host-based printer language exclusively for Windows was developed, and the dramatic increase in computer performance was also a major factor in achieving high print speeds at a low price.

MICROLINE 905PSII

MICROLINE 905PSII

In 1997 the world’s first True 1200dpi LED print head was included on a PostScript printer compatible with A3-extended paper, and high resolution on a PostScript printer was immediately achieved. LED printers eliminate image aberration caused by the correcting lenses found in laser optics, and there are no restrictions on print speed caused by the upper limit on the polygon motor’s rotating speed.

At the same time, print data was increasing dramatically, so controllers needed to operate at higher speeds. On this printer, an RISC CPU was used to increase the processing speed of large quantities of complex print data and raise throughput.

OKIPAGE 8c / MICROLINE 8c

OKIPAGE 8c / MICROLINE 8c
As the Internet spread, offices too quickly began converting to color printers, and environments were established that made it simple to create color documents, but color printers printed slowly and were inadequate for full-fledged office applications. For this reason, the printer had four independent light sources and image drum (ID) units for higher speeds arranged horizontally, and long years of development on tandem color printers that could simultaneously print four colors on one pass over the paper, steadily solving technical problems one by one, resulted in achievement in 1998 of the first color printer compatible with A4 size that could print eight pages a minute. Shipments were commenced, and the printer went on to form the basis of the color series technologies in use today.

1999-2004

C9200 / C9400 / MICROLINE 9050c / MICROLINE 3050c

C9200 / C9400 / MICROLINE 9050c / MICROLINE 3050c
As a result of developing the first MICROLINE 8c color printer, the market naturally wanted a printer that could handle A3 paper. Shifting development resources to color, we simultaneously developed an A4 model and A3 model, an achievement that would have been nearly impossible for competitors.

OKIPOS 425

OKIPOS 425
Differing from conventional SIDM printers, this compact, multifunction 9-pin printer from 2000 was developed for entry into the retail printer market. It could issue receipts and tickets, and print on roll paper used for sales records, checks (validation printing for endorsements) and receipts up to A4 size, tickets and other individual sheets. With an optional tractor unit, it could also handle continuous forms. A number of mechanisms were adopted for the first time, including a media-follow structure that automatically adjusted the print head cap depending on the paper thickness, and a rotating dual structure platen that prevented roll paper from going to waste.

ET-8480S

ET-8480S
This flat 24-pin kanji printer for the Japanese market from 2001 was designed to accommodate changes in market demand related to SIDM in conjunction with the spread of the Windows environment. Compared to previous models, it offered improved throughput thanks to higher internal data processing capacity, and improved line feed precision between adjacent lines. OKI Data’s first skew correction function (to automatically correct misaligned paper) was developed to further improve operability. Models with this function have been well received by users, and it is becoming a standard function on flatbed printers.

5860SP

5860SP

This multifunction flatbed printer could print on passbooks and poster board as thick as 2.7 mm, which had been difficult for conventional printers. It was developed in 2003 for the Chinese market, and is used in administrative printing applications for bank and postal passbooks and certificates such as household registries, medical and teaching certificates and diplomas.

It featured an automatic paper thickness adjustment mechanism using the media-follow method to allow it to print in a manner appropriate to the paper’s thickness, which makes it compatible with thick media in non-regular shapes. It also had a skew correction function (to automatically correct misaligned paper), which reduces the burden on the operator when setting the paper.

C9500 / C9300 / MICROLINE 9500PS / MICROLINE 9300PS

C9500 / C9300 / MICROLINE 9500PS / MICROLINE 9300PS
In 2003, positioned as the upgraded version of the C9200/9400, though the outside looked the same, major improvements were made to the inside. User operability was improved with an automatic paper thickness detection function, automatic color balance adjustment and more, while improvements were also made to the toner, the printer itself was further stabilized, its speed increased and its image quality raised. The tandem method had been a minor method on color engines, but around three-quarters of new products developed that year used the method and it became the most prevalent method used.

C5100 / C5300 / MICROLINE 5100 / MICROLINE 5300

C5100 / C5300 / MICROLINE 5100 / MICROLINE 5300
This printer incorporated all the color process functions of the C7500 / C7300 in a compact, low-priced product. In terms of performance for the price, no competitor could even come close—it provided three times the performance at the same price point, so sales volume grew, centering on the European market, and share expanded.

MICROLINE 6100F

MICROLINE 6100F
This 24-pin, compact flatbed printer was developed in 2004 primarily for the Chinese market, where SIDM demand was growing, and the low-price printer market in particular, where demand was substantial. Various steps were taken to achieve a lower cost, including consolidating functions for a simpler structure, conducting production locally in China, procuring parts and materials locally, and making design changes in response to local circumstances. Production took place at Oki Electric Industry (Shenzhen), OKI DATA’s production site in China.

2005-

C3400

C3400
OKI DATA developed the C3400n, a new ultra-compact, tandem single-pass color printer, in 2006 to command over half of the color printer market and launch a product into the low-price segment, which was continuing to grow. The product concept was low price (rigorous cost-cutting primarily through fewer parts and a more compact size), high speed (high-speed printing of 16 sheets/minute color and 19 sheets/minute monochrome achieved by leveraging the strengths of the tandem method while also reducing the size and cost), high print quality (new micro toner and color depth LED print head equivalent to those on high-end models) and good design (new friendly-looking rounded design adopted for display sales at large electronics retailers and because it was intended for the office and would generally sit on the operator’s desk).

C8600

C8600
This groundbreaking LED A3 color printer that rewrote the conventional wisdom on printers compatible with A3 size paper, was developed in 2006. At the time, 70% of printer sales volume in the Japanese market, where B4 and A3 sizes are used, were models that could handle A3 size, so major sales growth in Japan was expected. The C8600dn was designed based on expanding an A4 printer to A3 size, and since it utilized digital LED characteristics, even though it was an A3 printer, it could still be made compact and lightweight. In addition, the image quality of the C8600dn, which used a newly developed micro toner and a four-color-depth print method, was far superior even to rival printers that used a laser scanner head. Moreover, digital LED offers greater compactness, higher resolutions, higher speeds and lower prices and is superior to the laser scanner method in all respects, including performance and quality.

B430 / B410

B430 / B410
In 2008, office printers were shifting to color but at the same time, monochrome printers were also being steadily introduced. The A4 monochrome printer market in particular demanded models with duplex printing as a standard feature as a way to cut costs and reduce environmental burden. Two models, the B430 with 1,200 dpi resolution and the B410 with 600 dpi resolution, offered automatic duplex printing as a standard feature to help reduce paper consumption. In addition, they complied with ENERGY STAR requirements, the RoHS Directive and the Act on Promoting Green Purchasing and also offered exceptional environmental performance. Print speed was 28 pages per minute, and in the fast print mode, the printers could print as quick as a page around every five seconds.

C830 / C810

C830 / C810
This is an A3 color page printer for the office with a large capacity paper tray from 2008. It offered outstanding environmental performance, including compliance with ENERGY STAR, the RoHS directive, Eco Mark (a Japanese standard) and the Act on Promoting Green Purchasing (also a Japanese standard), and came equipped with an operations panel with an LCD screen that raised usability. The C830 in particular had a large-size LCD screen and functions for displaying easy-to-understand messages in graphics and kanji for toner levels and steps to take when errors occurred. It was capable of printing in color at the high rate of 30 pages a minute and had a large-capacity feed tray of up to 1,460 sheets. Security was also given consideration with an IC card authentication printing function that could conduct IC card-based authentication when outputting, and compatibility with a data protection kit that enables print data to be encrypted when saving on the printer’s internal hard disk—meaning security features extended to both paper documents and digital data.

MC860

MC860
OKI Data’s first A3 multifunction printer for the Japanese market was developed in 2008 for people who used multifunction printers and primarily printers, consolidating the company’s print technologies it had cultivated for so many years as an dedicated printer manufacturer. Based on the successful LED A3 color printer engine, it added copy, fax, scan and other functions, and demonstrated necessary and sufficient performance as a multifunction printer used in typical office work groups. It offered high basic performance that included a color print speed of 26 pages per minute (A4 landscape feed, single-sided copy mode), print resolution of 600x1200 dpi, high-end printing with MICROFINE HD toner, and automatic duplex printing as a standard feature. The copier came standard with a reversing automatic document feeder (RADF) compatible with double-sided A3 copying. It could perform consecutive copying at a rate of up to 50 sheets. The fax function could send and receive A3-size manuscripts and had a digitalization feature that allowed faxes received to be saved in PDF format on the file server or other location indicated.

C610 / C711

C610 / C711
This LED A4 color printer for office use from 2010 offered lowest-in-class sleep-mode power consumption as well as a fast print function. Its main characteristic was improved environmental performance as an environmentally conscious product, with 0.9 W power consumption in sleep mode, the lowest in its class, thanks to development of a dedicated LSI, and conformed with Eco Mark, the Act on Promoting Green Purchasing (Japanese standard) and International ENERGY STAR Program standards. Its second characteristic was enhanced media compatibility, and it further raised the paper feed performance of the multi-purpose tray to secure compatibility with 250 g/m2-thick paper. It provided exceptional feed performance even for a cassette feeder, and the C711dn even made possible automatic duplex printing on 220g/m2 paper. In addition, both models offered excellent paper-handling, including A5-size automatic duplex printing and long-scale printing of up to 1,320.8 mm, and were expected to be utilized for store POP displays, business document covers and in-house business card printing.

C530 / C510 / C310

C530 / C510 / C310
This LED A4 color printer announced in 2010 was equipped with cutting-edge environmental technologies and was the world’s thinnest of its kind at that time. It had a new LED print head that successfully saved resources by reducing the LED chip width by 22% compared to conventional models, and also offered automatic duplex printing, but was still the thinnest in the world at just 24.2 cm in height. The image drum unit, which had conventionally been separate for each color, was integrated and the distance between image drum units reduced to combine the waste toner boxes that had been different for each color in one location to successfully reduce the height by approximately 10 cm and the volume by around 40%—both major reductions—compared to previous models. In addition, equipped with proprietarily developed Green ASIC for higher environmental performance, the printer achieved lowest-in-class sleep-mode power consumption of 0.9 W. The integrated 4-color image drum unit in a basket format also further simplified maintenance.

MC561 / MC361

MC561 / MC361
This A4 color multifunction printer announced in 2010 was the world’s thinnest at the time and included the company’s first proprietarily developed scanner, high-speed automated duplex scanning and double-sided printing. Its major characteristic was being the world’s thinnest A4 color multifunction printer with duplex printing, at just 444 mm, while also offering as standard high-speed automatic duplex scanning and printing. It was successfully made around 8 cm lower in height and 20% smaller by volume compared to conventional models. It uses a unique automatic duplex scanning mechanism that first flips the scan manuscript to reduce the paper route length by 20% compared to conventional models for higher speeds and greater compactness. In terms of image quality, the printer used for the scanner is a high-resolution 1,200 dpi scanning sensor with two rows of LED light sources for beautiful scanning and printing that does not deteriorate in quality even for the small fonts on accounting slips and the like, which tend to deteriorate with repeated copying on conventional models.

B431dnB / B411dnB

B431dnB / B411dnB
In 2010, in celebration of major increases in sales of monochrome LED printers, the black-colored models B431dnB and B411dnB were announced. There had been an increase at the time in black-colored computers and other office devices, so there was increasing demand for black printers as well to match them. These black-colored models had a subdued matte finish that was lauded in North America for not showing dust or grime easily, and they were used with systems for automobile repair shops and the like. The black color was also the optimal model for use onsite at factories for example.

C841 / C811

C841 / C811
In 2011 a new model debuted that represented the further evolution of usability, performance and environmental sensitivity. In terms of usability, it was the world’s smallest A3 color printer by footprint (as of January 2012), and offered improved operating panel displays, particularly the help screens, which were made easier to understand. In terms of performance, high-speed printing was achieved at a rate of 35 pages per minute for both color and monochrome printing in a compact size that was the world’s smallest. In addition, adoption of a new fixing method shortened the warm-up time to around one-third of previous models for a quicker start-up. Regarding environmental sensitivity, low standby power consumption was realized through development of a new type of power unit, and lower power consumption overall was achieved by including an auto off function for automatically turning the power off when the printer was not in use for a certain amount of time.

C920WT

C920WT
The C920WT LED A3 color printer with white toner, which launched in North America in 2011, is an extremely unique product that was developed utilizing the sharp, high resolution print performance of LED print heads, varied color-depth expressiveness, and a simple structure using the flat paper path method. Applications for white toner include printing on T-shirts or cloth bags, for example. Printing on such objects involves drawing the picture in color on special transfer paper for toner and then transferring the transfer paper printed in white onto the cloth or polyester material using a hot press. Normal printing is done in full color using the four toner colors CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow and black), but the C920WT has white toner instead of the black and prints in black and full color through combinations of CMY, which provides high quality and high image quality optimal for printing on transfer paper.

C301

C301
This is an LED A4 color printer from 2012. It was the world’s thinnest design at the time, suitable for use at a desk, and at a low price point while also providing the high performance of an LED printer and durability for a long, 300,000-page print life.

MC362 / MC562

MC362 / MC562
In 2013, companies were actively installing wireless LAN systems, as business activities came to increasingly rely on tablets, smartphones and other mobile devices. This trend was particularly the case at small offices, stores and other tight spaces, where there was increasing need for compact multifunction printers with wireless LAN capability. The MC362dnw and MC562dnw have a wireless LAN function and are compatible with the printing app AirPrint™ provided by Apple. It allows an iPhone, iPad or other iOS device to automatically detect the MC562dnw/362dnw on the local wireless network, which makes it possible to print directly from that device. In addition, the models come standard with automatic duplex printing, and a reversing automatic document feeder (RADF) for scanning and copying. They offer high functionality and performance in a compact size, achieved by leveraging the characteristics of the proprietary LED print head.

C941

C941
The MIRCOLINE VINCI C941dn LED A3 color printer with 5-color printing was launched worldwide starting in Japan in October 2013. It features an LED print head for sharp, high-resolution printing, OKI DATA’s first intermediate transfer method to strengthen compatibility with diverse types of paper, and a simple structure in the flat paper path format for high-speed printing, and serves as our flagship model for the professional market. The C941dn is OKI DATA’s first color printer to print in 5-color toner, adding to CMYK a special “white” and a special “clear” as the fifth color. Printing in full color plus white and clear makes possible diverse design expressions and provides rich color reproducibility.

Copyright ©1995-2017 Oki Data corporation. All rights reserved.